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Wednesday, June 19

  1. page Wireless Power edited What is Wireless Power? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]] Anyo…

    What is Wireless Power?
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    Anyone who attends a class or meeting where most of the participants have laptop computers is well aware that there are never enough power outlets — and when they are available, they are invariably located in inconvenient places. Wireless power, already being prototyped by several companies, promises to alleviate the problem by making power for charging batteries in devices readily available. Using near-field inductive coupling, power can be transmitted through special surfaces or even through open space to charge devices within a home, office, school, or other setting. Consumer products are already entering the market; the Powermat, for instance, charges up to three devices placed onto its surface (each device must first be slipped into a compatible sleeve). Fulton Innovation's eCoupled technology is designed to be built into desks and countertops, enabling not only power transfer but also other wireless communications between devices placed on the surfaces. Witricity is developing transmitters that would be embedded in walls or other furniture, transferring power via inductive coupling to receivers attached to devices anywhere within the home or classroom. The impact of wireless power for education will primarily be felt in learning spaces; the devices we carry will become more useful and easier to maintain, with increased opportunity for longer use in a variety of settings.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Larry Feb 7, 2012
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    add your response here
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    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
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    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative expression?
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  2. page WhatsNew edited What's New? The results are in! Check out the final topics, technologies, and challenges that m…

    What's New?
    The results are in! Check out the final topics, technologies, and challenges that made the report -- Download the Preview PDF.
    The Short List is ready! Download the interim report PDF that will help the advisory board make their final rankings for the NMC Horizon Report > 2013 K-12 Edition.
    Round One rankings have been completed! Find out which technologies, trends, and challenges will make the Short List by viewing the tallies and raw data PDF.
    We're done! Read the NMC Horizon Report>2013 K-12 Edition

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  3. page Web Aggregation Tools edited What are Web Aggregation Tools? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"…

    What are Web Aggregation Tools?
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    Aggregation is the process of transparently gathering together distributed pieces of online content based on an interest in the topic(s), the author(s), or other shared characteristics. RSS readers are one way to aggregate data, but with the increase in personal publishing, new tools for aggregation are emerging. Using these tools, readers can easily track a distributed conversation that takes place across blogs, Twitter, and other publishing platforms, as well as pull in relevant resources from news feeds and other sources.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Larry Feb 7, 2012~
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    add your response here
    add your response here
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    add your response here
    add your response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative expression?
    add your response here
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  4. page Wearable Technology edited What is Wearable Technology? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]] …

    What is Wearable Technology?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]
    Wearable technology refers to devices that can be worn by users, taking the form of an accessory such as jewelry, sunglasses, a backpack, or even actual items of clothing such as shoes or a jacket. The benefit of wearable technology is that it can conveniently integrate tools, devices, power needs, and connectivity within a user’s everyday life and movements. Google's “Project Glass” features one of the most talked about current examples — the device resembles a pair of glasses, but with a single lens. A user can see information about their surroundings displayed in front of them, such as the names of friends who are in close proximity, or nearby places to access data that would be relevant to a research project. Wearable technology is still very new, but one can easily imagine accessories such as gloves that enhance the user’s ability to feel or control something they are not directly touching. Wearable technology already in the market includes clothing that charges batteries via decorative solar cells, allows interactions with a user’s devices via sewn-in controls or touch pads, or collects data on a person's exercise regimen from sensors embedded in the heels of their shoes.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Larry Feb 7, 2012
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    For K12 one concern is that students will abuse the technology, pliable displays make it so that the devices are more challenging to break from dropping it. By reimagining where students are working and how they work new possiblities for what the learning environment looks like emerges. When a screen is no longer a physical barrier between the learner and the learning environment and the device becomes more integrated with the learner (ie: google glass... not exactly this topic, but the idea of the device being integrated with the person) new ways of accessing and displaying learning become possible. mrskeeler Feb 28, 2013
    davidwdeeds Mar 2, 2013 As if texting while driving weren't dangerous enough... ;)
    jim.siegl Mar 4, 2013 At a basic evel, wearable computing seems like the ultimate extension of "mobile computing". I could see a few broad categories of uses for "wearable" devices in education
    Wearable computing in terms of sensors/data collection, such as devices like the fitbit http://www.fitbit.com or the MOVband (a "fitbit for schools") http://www.movable.com (overlaps with "Interent of Things" topic)
    As an assistive technology, replacing bulk communication devices with iPads and Proloquo2Go, I can see similar potential applications in this for Google Glass and other wearables,
    As a display device for some of the other technologies on the list such as real time translation, virtual assistant, virtual worlds etc..
    As a delivery mechanism for what should probably be its own topic - Augmented Reality, for simulations, field trips,
    As input device for some of the other technologies (natural user interfaces))
    Here are a couple of articles that spark one's thinking:
    http://www.psfk.com/2013/02/wearable-technology-designs.html
    Electronic basketball measures skills:
    http://www.psfk.com/2013/03/electronic-tracking-basketball.html michael.lambert Mar 4, 2013
    jackwest Mar 4, 2013 This is coming, and sooner than we thought. The backlash will be significant, and if the technology does not prove itself useful in ed right away, it will be several years before we see it entering classrooms.
    I think this technology is here already. Athletes around the world are using all types of monitoring equipment to measure aspects of their body performance. Airlines are beginning to ask pilots to connect to monitoring equipment to measure heart rate etc. The defence forces of many countries use wearable monitoring equipment. This like many other topics, will see many students (the early adopters) embrace this concept. Especially if it is seen as trendy to wear the gadgets. Tony.Brandenburg Mar 5, 2013
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    Include wearable along with the pliable. Having a pliable device is cool, but really not that much different than an iPad in many situations, it is still a separate device. Integrating the device into clothing, or other ways that the user and the technology more naturally work together changes how things are done. mrskeeler Feb 28, 2013
    The total disruption of the classroom when students show up recording everything that happens and schools have not prepared for this eventuality. (Banning is not preparation). Derrel.Fincher Mar 5, 2013
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative expression?
    I see students being able to not be hindered by lugging around a device and to have data recorded automatically to help them to be more efficient to creating and engineering during instruction. mrskeeler Feb 28, 2013
    jackwest Mar 4, 2013 Internet of things are enlivened with your device, using location, instead of needing NFC. Aurasma for everything in a science lab. Flat text can be recognized by software in the glasses and provide relevant information by the user. For teachers, the link from face to database can pose relevant questions based on student prior performance. This is limitless.
    Life recording - forget the diary. We already have examples of this. Keeping this data private and secure will be critical. We've had sexting; with wearables, how soon before the first wexting? Derrel.Fincher Mar 5, 2013
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    Glass, and I have to believe that Apple is working on one that we will be hearing about shortly.
    I was involved with a European project a number of years ago called "EduWear" which was centred on developing a kit for use with students to explore the possibilities of wearable technology. Here are some links that might give a flavour of the projecthttp://dimeb.informatik.uni-bremen.de/eduwear/about-2/
    http://www.womenandtechnology.eu/digitalcity/servlet/PublishedFileServlet/AAABULTV/EduwearKit.pdf
    http://www.womenandtechnology.eu/digitalcity/servlet/PublishedFileServlet/AAABULTY/EduWear-Basics.pdfdeirdre.butler Mar 5, 2013
    add your response here
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  5. page Watch Lists edited [[include component="page" page="PressClippingsNav"]] Press Clippings: Publis…
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    Press Clippings: Published Technologies to Watch Lists
    This area is a place to collect "Technologies to Watch" lists published by other organizations. Though these lists and publications may serve a different audience and purpose than the Horizon Report does, they contain many useful descriptions and discussions that can and should inform our work.
    We'd love to see your clippings here as well! Please use the edit this page button to add more, or add comments on how or why you think they may or may not be important. As is the convention throughout the Horizon Project Wiki, we ask you to identify items you think are of high interest to us, as I have done here by typing 4 tilde (~) characters-- Larry Jul 6, 2012. This will help us to sift through the articles and determine which ones resonate most strongly with the board as a whole.
    Recommended Reading
    5 Big Education Technology Trends of 2013
    http://edudemic.com/2012/12/the-5-big-education-technology-trends-of-2013/
    Among the trends identified by Edudemic staff are: 3D printing, universities offering free courseware, and social media to educate communities.
    5 K-12 Technology Trends to Watch in 2013
    http://thejournal.com/articles/2013/01/15/5-k12-technology-trends-to-watch-in-2013.aspx
    This is a list of five key areas that will have a great impact on K-12 education in the oncoming year from next-generation video production to data analytics.Tony.Brandenburg Mar 2, 2013 nothing new, but education is closer to making these thoughts real.Tony.Brandenburg Mar 2, 2013 I think the term big data sometimes scares educators. Big data can be as simple as analysing attendance documents to identify student preference, best times, subjects that best run concurrently or sequentially etc..ryan.tomaps Mar 6, 2013 lindsay.julie Mar 3, 2013 As a few articles point out, the use of predictive data seems to be just around the corner. I think it's a fascinating area for K12 which is going to dramatically shift instruction. digitalroberto Mar 5, 2013kathryn.moyle Mar 6, 2013ryan.tomaps Mar 6, 2013 deirdre.butler Mar 6, 2013Teachers I agree are often scared by term "big data" andn I think if they realised how much potential this has for being able to mine data to try and understand problems or to interrogate opinion based decision they would be excited to realise the world of possibilities it would open up for authentic meaningful problem-solving.alex.podchaski Mar 7, 2013
    10 Emerging Technologies You Should Know About
    http://edudemic.com/2012/09/10-emerging-education-technologies/
    Contributor for Edudemic describes 10 edtech technologies that are innovating teaching and learning -- among them are open-source course management system Moodle and collaborative research platform Mendeley. lindsay.julie Mar 3, 2013kathryn.moyle Mar 6, 2013
    20 Tech Trends That Will Define 2013, Selected by Frog
    http://www.fastcodesign.com/1671397/20-tech-trends-that-will-define-2013-selected-by-frog#1
    Multidisciplinary engineering and design firm predicts that 20 tredns that will affect telecommunications, healthcare, media, etc. Among them -- automated vehicles, more humanistic computers, more diverse data ecology, and more sophisticated interfaces.
    2013 tech trends: wearable computing; space tourism and more
    http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/blog/atlantech/2013/01/2013-tech-trends-wearable-computing.html
    Georgia Tech vice president, Stephen Fleming, predicts top technology trends for 2013 that Atlanta companies are helping drive. Some of these align with our edtech research for the Horizon Reports while others touch on some other interesting aspects of our future daily lives. lindsay.julie Mar 3, 2013deirdre.butler Mar 6, 2013alex.podchaski Mar 7, 2013
    Cisco's Prediction of 2013 Education Technology Trends: The Big Three to Watch
    http://blogs.cisco.com/education/ciscos-prediction-of-2013-education-technology-trends-the-big-three-to-watch/
    The leader of the US Public Sector Education at Cisco describes three edtech trend to watch for in 2013 -- The Internet of Everything, shared services, and cloud computing. lindsay.julie Mar 3, 2013helen.padgett Mar 4, 2013ryan.tomaps Mar 6, 2013 deirdre.butler Mar 6, 2013alex.podchaski
    The Education Revolution Continues: 4 Top Education Tech Trends for 2013
    http://networkingexchangeblog.att.com/enterprise-business/scanning-for-a-sign/the-education-revolution-continues-4-top-education-tech-trends-for-2013
    Lead Manager for Education Marketing at AT&T lists the 4 edtech trends we will see in 2013 -- game-based learning, personalized mobile learning environments, cloud-based collbaration, and the flipped classroom davidwdeeds Feb 27, 2013 Been there, done that. ;) lindsay.julie Mar 3, 2013 I am tired of hearing about the flipped classroom as being a new trend - haven't good educators always flipped their classroom? deirdre.butler Mar 6, 2013alex.podchaski Mar 7, 2013
    Forrester’s top 15 emerging technologies
    http://venturebeat.com/2013/02/07/forresters-top-15-emerging-technologies/
    Research firm Forrester looks at how today's hot technologies will lead to some future disruptions in the following four categories: end user computing technologies, sensors and remote computing technologies, process data management technologies, and infrastructure and application platforms.paul Mar 5, 2013alex.podchaski Mar 7, 2013
    Major Ed-Tech Trends for 2013
    http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2013/01/23/major-ed-tech-trends-for-2013/
    In this infographic designed by onlinecolleges.net, 4 major trends are shown (they match Edudemic's) with a few more predictions regarding game-based learning, BYOD, open textbooks, and e-books. davidwdeeds Feb 27, 2013 I'm a little concerned that "game-based learning" is becoming associated more with, e.g., Minecraft, than OpenSimulator. Check out the Military Open Simulator Enterprise Strategy project: http://openvce.net/moses. Now if we could just channel this time, effort and money to education versus the military!!alex.podchaski Mar 7, 2013
    Technology Areas to Watch in 2012 through 2016
    http://nextbigfuture.com/2011/12/technology-areas-to-watch-in-2012.html
    According to this article, robotics an hyperbroadband among others are on this list of technology areas where we may see major developments over the next four years/
    What to Expect from Education in 2013
    http://www.teachthought.com/trends/what-to-expect-from-education-in-2013/
    The Director of Curriculum at TeachThought believes that 2013 will be characterized by disruption, and describes 25 trends that the future holds for education. davidwdeeds Feb 27, 2013Tony.Brandenburg Mar 2, 2013 the more interesting of the articles, in particular, it touches on venture capital funding for alternative school models. lindsay.julie Mar 3, 2013 This is one of the better articles as it hones in on classroom as well as entrepreneurial aspects helen.padgett Mar 4, 2013Interesting take on VC in education, more and more rumblings of this the last 6 months.digitalroberto Mar 5, 2013Several things I would like to see a more expanded discussion on from this article: Development of a K-12 learning platformed designed for F2F classrooms (not a Higher Ed platformed that's modified), crowd sourced content development and sharing, less about HW (tablet) more about app and apps that create a learning environment of connected apps ryan.tomaps Mar 6, 2013deirdre.butler Mar 6, 2013alex.podchaski Mar 7, 2013

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  6. page Visual Data Analysis edited What is Visual Data Analysis? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]…

    What is Visual Data Analysis?
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    Visual data analysis blends highly advanced computational methods with sophisticated graphics engines to tap the extraordinary ability of humans to see patterns and structure in even the most complex visual presentations. Currently applied to massive, heterogeneous, and dynamic datasets, such as those generated in studies of astrophysical, fluidic, biological, and other complex processes, the techniques have become sophisticated enough to allow the interactive manipulation of variables in real time. Ultra high-resolution displays allow teams of researchers to zoom into interesting aspects of the renderings, or to navigate along interesting visual pathways, following their intuitions and even hunches to see where they may lead. New research is now beginning to apply these sorts of tools to the social sciences as well, and the techniques offer considerable promise in helping us understand complex social processes like learning, political and organizational change, and the diffusion of knowledge.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Larry Feb 7, 2012
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    Fold this into Learning Analytics? bwatwood Mar 12, 2012
    add your response here
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    add your response here
    add your response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative expression?
    add your response here
    add your response here
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    add your response here
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  7. page Virtual Worlds edited What are Virtual Worlds? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]] Vir…

    What are Virtual Worlds?
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    Virtual worlds garnered a tremendous amount of attention in 2006-2009, when millions of individuals created online avatars and institutions were developing building after building on designated plots of virtual land. In Linden Lab’s Second Life®, world-class universities hosted thousands of educational projects and experiments, from recreating historical spaces to replicating renowned museums and works of art. A lot of energy was devoted to building tools, climate simulators, physics engines, and facilitating the overall capability of these platforms to simulate reality. The idea was that these environments could foster unique and immersive learning opportunities, doing so in a way that uniquely made people feel like that were together in the same place. While the hype around virtual worlds has waned in recent years, there are still compelling developments, mainly in the form of WebGL, a new way of rendering 3D objects in via a web browser, which has been applied in virtual worlds. CloudParty, a Facebook application, is a good example of the capability of WebGL, though it is more of a hangout space and does not have as strong a tie to learning as do other purpose-built spaces. Google is a leading player in academic WebGL technology, and its vast collection of user contributed “Chrome Experiments” range from an interactive timeline of satellite launches to a visualization of connected cells that enable people to create biologically-inspired patterns.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Larry Feb 7, 2012
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    davidwdeeds Mar 2, 2013 What's this about "waning interest"? If we're just talking about Second Life, I agree, but this is primarily a matter of cost. OpenSimulator is going to take over as the #1 Virtual World for education within two years...or as soon as the software can get to Version 1.0, whichever comes first! They've already solved the common currency problem via PayPal. The only thing missing is...wait for it...coming up in (2). ;)jmorrison Mar 4, 2013
    Just one other thought on VW learning, it is our limited experience that the work in world is better for ELL or Special Ed students vs. AP students. Educational use with special populations can positively impact their learning. jmorrison Mar 5, 2013
    http://www.stcc.edu/esl/virtualcampus.asp
    add your response here
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    davidwdeeds Mar 2, 2013 I'm in the process of selling the Tri-Association (an organization of 60+ schools in Central/South America and Mexico) on the idea of a 3D Global Village...a Second Life only for teachers/students, using OpenSimulator. Classic example of why this is needed: the upcoming Global Issues Network Conference in Costa Rica. Our kids want to go but can't afford it. If the conference were to be held inworld, they could...and so could many others.jmorrison Mar 4, 2013
    Moving around is just complex and confusing in a virtual world because we don't have the cues we get in RL - Surround sound, vibration, and easy vision shifts. Virtual worlds will become much more usable when integrated with wearable tech and can function either as full virtual or as augmented reality. Right now it's akin to gaming - some love it; some don't. When it becomes more natural and integrative, it will be more usable. Derrel.Fincher Mar 5, 2013
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative expression?
    davidwdeeds Mar 2, 2013 Imagine each school maintaining its own private OpenSimulator grid. Local access control would be absolute...no one would get in or out without administrator approval. Another school or organization would host the central grid...the meeting place. The central grid would allow hypergridding only from authorized (member) schools...and then from this grid teachers/students could hypergrid to other member school grids. This solves the security problem...everything would be private versus public...and prevents kids from seeing anything objectionable...everything would be G-rated. So it offers the best of both (virtual) worlds...security plus the ability to interact with others. Oh, yeah...it'd be affordable too. A private grid via a host like Dreamland Metaverse (http://www.dreamlandmetaverse.com/) is only $45 a month. If a school can't afford that, then they can piggyback on another institution's. This is part of what we're planning on offering as an attempt (a modest one, sure) to bridge the Digital Divide. All we need is a host for the central grid...gee, maybe the NMC would be interested??
    add your response here
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    davidwdeeds Mar 2, 2013 I've been maintaining OpenSimulator grids for more than three years now...both inhouse and via hosts like ReactionGrid and Dreamland Metaverse. We're getting a Language Exchange Program going with a school in Virginia...so their students can study Spanish with ours...our kids are pretty good at Spanish, doncha know. But here at Peterson Schools OpenSimulator really started to get some respect when I told the powers-that-be about the MOSES (Military Open Simulator Enterprise Strategy) Project: http://openvce.net/moses. Now if we can just get this kind of investment (time, effort, money) behind using virtual worlds for educational versus military purposes!
    jackwest Mar 4, 2013 Minecraft is absolutely taking the 7 to 12 year old boy world by storm. I hear that some teachers are employing the 3d constructive environment for science classes, but I am skeptical of the real pedagogical value here. Artistically, I see the potential, but in other disciplines I still need to be convinced.
    mscofino Mar 8, 2013 (Note: I'm not sure if this belongs here or in the gamification trend report) Middle School Humanities teachers Rebekah Madrid and Alex Guenther at Yokohama International School are currently teaching several units through Minecraft. Frank Curkovic (MS Art at YIS) is teaching a unit on community and collaboration through Minecraft. Minecraft is increasingly becoming part of our content curriculum, and collaborative and individual work is being assessed the same way we assess more "traditional" projects. A reflection on the Humanities unit by Alex:
    http://alexguenther.wordpress.com/2012/11/29/course-5-final-project-reflection/ and by Rebekah:
    http://rebekahmadrid.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/7th-graders-and-one-teacher-learning-with-minecraft/
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  8. page Virtual Assistants edited What are Virtual Assistants? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]] …

    What are Virtual Assistants?
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    As voice recognition and gesture-based technologies advance and more recently, converge, we are moving away from the notion of interaction with our devices via a pointer and keyboard. Virtual assistants are the natural end goal of natural user interfaces (NUI), and build on developments in interfaces across the spectrum of engineering, computer science, and biometrics. A new class of smart televisions will be among the first devices to make comprehensive use of the idea. While crude versions of virtual assistants have been around for some time, we have yet to achieve the level of interactivity seen in Apple's classic video, Knowledge Navigator. The Apple iPhone’s Siri and Android's Jellybean are recent mobile-based examples, and allow users to control all the functions of the phone, participate in lifelike conversations with users, and more. Microsoft Research is devoting considerable resources to developing NUIs. Virtual assistants for learning are clearly in the long-term horizon, but the potential of the technology to add substance to informal modes of learning is compelling.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Larry Feb 8, 2012
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    Tony.Brandenburg Mar 2, 2013 One expects that as personalised learning is further developed that virtual assistants will play a key role. In some respects we see this beginning now in special needs and second/third language classrooms now. (I smile as Siri, answers my questions and includes my name!)
    Just as we have personal trainers, mentors, life coaches, etc., perhaps, we'll have virtual assistances who can somehow view our classes, then provide us a few instructional tips. Something similar to automated grading can do with essays. This allows for feed-in without judgement, same as when we watch ourselves on video. Essay grader: www.paperrater.com michael.lambert Mar 4, 2013
    A virtual assistant might take over some of the 'product' duties that are currently incumbent of the student.jmorrison Mar 4, 2013
    helen.padgett Mar 5, 2013 Natural user interface (NUI) is focused on leveraging skills people have already acquired (precise finger dexterity, etc.) to use and navigate technology rather than asking the user to acquire other skills, such as using a mouse or keyboard, to interact with the technology.
    It might mean it is becoming less important for students to learn to touch-type.paul Mar 6, 2013
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    Tony.Brandenburg Mar 2, 2013I think we need to remember the VA/NUIs will rely on stored and readily accessible profile information, which in education terms will include results, statistics, preferred models of learning..
    helen.padgett Mar 5, 2013 Microsoft Research has been investigating natural user interface (NUI) for a number of years. Their website shares a variety of new user interfaces —utilizing gestures, machine anticipation, contextual awareness, and rich, 3-D environments, both real and virtual, and often immersive— that will make computing easier, more inviting, and increasingly intuitive. http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/news/features/030210-nui.aspx
    helen.padgett Mar 5, 2013 I think this topic might be combined with Natural User Interfaces
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative expression?
    Tony.Brandenburg Mar 2, 2013 In many respects this area brings together many of the identified Horizon focus areas. The need to provide learning experiences in a model that is acceptable to the user, with an interface that recognises individual differences has potential.
    helen.padgett Mar 5, 2013 Apple and Google’s operating systems are platforms on top of which the things a person needs sit. When Apple and Google make their virtual assistants Siri and Now work more effectively, that could be replaced by a much more centralized approach. Want something? Ask Apple Siri or turn to Google Now and they’ll do the work of dealing with all those Web pages and apps for the teacher or student.
    add your response here
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    add your response here
    add your response here
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  9. page Virtual and Remote Laboratories edited What are Virtual and Remote Laboratories? [[include component="page" page="Topic…

    What are Virtual and Remote Laboratories?
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    Virtual and remote laboratories reflect a movement among education institutions to make all the equipments and elements of a physical science laboratory more easily available to learners from wherever they are via the web. Virtual laboratories are web applications that emulate the operation of real laboratories and enable students to practice in a “safe” environment before using real, physical components. Examples include an optical networking virtual lab and a virtual lab for programmable logic controllers. Students can typically access virtual labs 24/7, from wherever they are, and run the same experiments over and over again. Some emerging virtual lab platforms also incorporate reporting templates that populate with the results of the experiments so that students and teachers can easily review the outcomes. Remote laboratories provide a virtual interface to a real, physical laboratory. Institutions that do not have access to certain high-caliber lab equipment can run experiments and perform lab work online, accessing the tools from a central location. Users are able to manipulate the equipment and watch the activities unfold via a webcam on a computer or mobile device. This provides students with a realistic view of system behavior and allows them access professional laboratory tools from wherever they are, whenever they need. Additionally, remote labs alleviate some financial burden from institutions as they can forgo purchasing specific equipment and use the remote tools that are at their disposal.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Larry Feb 7, 2012
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    davidwdeeds Mar 2, 2013 This falls under the category of Virtual Worlds, I think.cristiana.mattos Mar 5, 2013 Not only. Could be in the category of simulators as well.
    One advantage is cost, especially for under-resourced schools. This allow students to have an virtual experience of the experiements even if they have no physical access to the equipment. hornmun.cheah Mar 6, 2013
    Virtual labs have nearly the same impact as physical labs -- making the subject real to the student. It's a very important part of showing students the relevance of what they're learning. Properly designed they are motivational as well as improving understanding and retention. Labs are most often associated with science and engineering but they are valuable for math and literacy as well. brandt.redd Mar 7, 2013
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    Virtual labs can be an important introduction of technique and practice before doing real, physical lab work. brandt.redd Mar 7, 2013
    add your response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry?
    add your response here
    add your response here
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    jackwest Mar 4, 2013 Peter Sand's ManyLabs is getting a lot of attention from the SF Bay Area Maker community, but it is not yet seeing widespread use.
    The Circuits Simulator embedded in the MIT Circuits MOOC: https://6002x.mitx.mit.edu/ brandt.redd Mar 7, 2013
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  10. page Twitter edited Horizon Report in Twitter Follow what people are talking about on Twitter about the Horizon Rep…

    Horizon Report in Twitter
    Follow what people are talking about on Twitter about the Horizon Report.

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